Redacted

You ever wonder what it might be like to be ‘security’ at an event? They’re not like the ‘doorman’ at a club, whom you notice right away. The mind springs to the trope of – not ‘I thought you’d be bigger’ Dalton from the Patrick Swayze classic Roadhouse – but a large, intimidating mountain of a human with a ‘don’t muck with me’ scowl.

Think of your favorite music festival.   See any of that type there? Nope. So who are the security? And what’s it like to constantly be checking your ‘6s’? After the first time you get jumped, or outright attacked, how does that change your perspective? Do you now look at everybody around you differently?

We posed that question to Vali Majd, founder and director of JTF Security Group. He replied with a nice laugh. “We work and train hard to avoid those situations,” he smiles. “We have very few incidents at the events we work because of our preplanning. We are there and we are doing our job. We constantly do ejections at work, medical work, we are always busy. But a lot of what we do isn’t seen because, even though we are a security company, we look at ourselves as also being a public relations company too. “

One other thing that sets JTF apart is that, unlike many if not most of the other security companies, is they are fully hands-on. A lot of other security companies policy is to ‘record and report’; they don’t get hands on. They call 911. “Whereas we usually get hired,” says Majd, “because clients want security that can step in and diffuse and deal with situations so the RCMP doesn’t have to get involved, other than to take the person away when we get them outside. “

For example, ——— has a massive influx of people into Comox and there is the need to coordinate between fire, RCMP and other security companies. “We need to make sure we have our full threat assessments done,” says Majd. “For local events we look at risks of, yes, terrorism, to sweeps of grounds to make sure nothing is left behind. We are always keeping eyes out for kids and minors who may need assistance, or who may be in precarious situations regarding drugs and alcohol. We offer a service, and while we are concerned about safety and well-being, it is customer service that we offer. We can run patrols, to running and commanding very large operations.”

Right after the ———- – ———— events Majd takes very seriously – it goes right to the —— and there and you have a massive movement of people that has to be managed and looked after and deal with incidents. Fights break out, there are medical emergencies, lost kids, parking and traffic problems, “So we manage everything in the background,” says Majd, predominantly by having different teams with different roles assigned to different team members. As soon as the fireworks is over, they work is to clear the area. “ I think we have it down now to somewhere under 19 minutes,” Majd is proud to say.

“At the ——–, everything in the background needs to be pre-planned,” he explains. Our motto is essentially, 95% pre-planning; 5% damage control. We excel at both of them. To do that we spend a lot of time preparing with the organizers and the other agencies so that things go off like clockwork.”

Majd’s backgroung is roughly 30 years of martial arts training and over 20 years of studying conflict and conflict resolution. “It’s not the violence. It’s precursors,” he says. “How it comes about, how it looks, how it’s managed, how it’s de-escalated and terminated. As we all know, one thing often leads to another. A lot of my senior employees are students of mine, which is why I have a strong team to work with. It’s the hands-on work, the de-escalation communication skills. It’s all the time we put into it and that’s what puts us in a different category altogether in terms of security services. We are very careful. We take the time to recognize who is mentally agitated due to drugs vs mental illness and treat everyone with all the respect possible. “

Vali Majd can be reached at 250.218.8097. Visit them online at www.JTFCanada.com.

 

Leave a Comment: